Car Engine Oils FAQ

Car engine oils frequently asked questions

Pouring Mobil 1 into engineUnderstand more about how to use Mobil™ products to look after your vehicle and keep your engine running smoothly. 

What role does viscosity play in a motor oil?

Engineers work to establish an optimal viscosity for an oil, based on load and speed conditions. They balance lighter – or low-viscosity – oil, which provides little resistance to motion thereby saving fuel and efficiently transferring horsepower, with a heavier – or high-viscosity – oil that resists being squeezed out of the contact area between metal surfaces. 

The complicating factor is that the viscosity of an oil varies with changes in temperature – thinner when hot, thicker when cold. At low temperatures, we need the motor oil to flow readily (not thicken too much or gel). At high temperatures, we need the motor oil to keep from becoming too thin and allowing metal-to-metal contact. Therefore, engineers developed multigrade motor oils. 

What does viscosity mean? 

Viscosity is a measure of a fluid's resistance to flow. A fluid with low viscosity flows easily and is often called "thin." Water is an example of a fluid with a relatively low viscosity. A fluid with high viscosity is often described as "thick." Maple syrup is an example of a fluid with a relatively high viscosity. 

What is the API service category classification system?

Engine oils are currently classified by a two-letter code. Gasoline engine oil categories start with the letter S (originally designated "Spark Ignition" engine oils, we now associate the S with "Service"). Diesel engine oil categories start with the letter C (originally designated "Compression Ignition" engine oils, we now associate the C with "Commercial"). 

The second letter is simply a sequential designation of improving quality levels over time. In other words, when a new industry quality level is established, the next letter of the alphabet is used (so SJ replaces SH). The letters "I" and "K" were purposefully skipped to eliminate potential confusion with other commonly used designations. 

What does a viscosity index number mean?

The viscosity index (VI) number is a measure of the relative change in viscosity of oil over a temperature range. The HIGHER the viscosity index, the SMALLER the viscosity change over temperature. The VI is not related to the actual viscosity or SAE viscosity, but is a measure of the rate of viscosity change. 

The VI number is typically used only as an indicator. The actual performance results of low-temperature pumpability tests and high-temperature wear tests of a motor oil are better predictors of good performance in an engine. 

Generally, multigrade oils (0W-40, 10W-30, etc.) will have high viscosity indexes. Monograde oils (SAE 30, 40, etc.) will have lower viscosity indexes. 

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